44% of people lose their mobile

A whopping 44% of people who own smart phones lose their devices, and many are never found again. According to research conducted by Nut Tag in collaboration with IDG Research, over 40% of the devices are left by their owners in public places such as the coffee shops and parks. 14% of the number is lost to burglary at homes or in vehicles. 

Moreover, the research also found out that over 27% of the phones were stolen in nightclubs and restaurants combined, and just over 5% were stolen off the street. 

Another interesting fact from the research is that over half would pay AUD 700 to get back their phones, while a whopping third would pay AUD 1,200 to get their phones back. Too many, nearly two-thirds are willing risk danger to retrieve their devices. The device itself is not the reason for going to such lengths, but the data in the device is so valuable that they would risk safety to get it back. Surprisingly, all such sums of money are way above what they would invest to secure their phones with a tracking device. 

Smart phones are attracting increased numbers of thieves. According to a survey by Consumer Reports, there were more than three million devices lost or stolen in 2013. Smartphone theft has become rampant in some of the largest cities in the world. Cities such as Melbourne, New York, Los Angeles, and London have reported an increase in the number of phones reported lost or stolen in recent years.

Research shows, most of the phones are stolen or get lost when not in the possession of the owner, when the owner is engaged elsewhere or distracted. Phone theft often arises in public places whilst concentration is diverted. Leave phones at tables or public transport is also very common. 

NutTag helps you to avoid being part of the 44%, it offers separation alert which will ensure that if you walk away from your mobile phone you are alerted, every time. It saves you claiming on insurance and most importantly your sentimental data will be safe. 


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